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My ageing Toshiba laptop is definitely on its last legs and I am researching what to buy as a replacement.  With the lockdown measures here (Spain) I can't even go to a decent computer shop, as it would involve going out of my autonomous region, which is not permitted and carries a big fine should I take the chance.  Hence, I am having to do a lot of price/specs research on the web.

I've narrowed it down to a couple or three models, but the one that I really fancy is the HONOR MagicBook Pro.  I only need a general purpose machine, no heavy gaming or anything like that - I won't even be running MSP on it Wink .  I've set a budget of €1,000 maximum and by the time I have added an external DVD drive, a few extra ports and card reader, that's pretty close to my limit.

This model has only recently been available in Europe and I was wondering if any of you Stateside guys has got one and can say how it performs for real?
Hope you're aware these are made by Huawei. Good luck.
(11-08-2020, 10:23 PM)otnt Wrote: [ -> ]Hope you're aware these are made by Huawei. Good luck.

I'm aware of the Huawei connection.  I hardly think that buying one of these is going to compromise Spanish security and Huawei have a reputation for making good stuff (which is why many of the worlds telecoms industries have invested in their kit).
Before giving any suggestions, better say what you will use the notebook for, or what "absolute nono's" you have.

As a 99% Linux user I am very content with a Lenovo T470 that I bought as 2nd hand machine, with 16 GB RAM, 1 TB SSD and two docks, for less than 400 EUR. In general: If you don't have a very special application case that requires top-of-the row power in any aspect, better buy a used machine for one of the many nerds who think only the newest machines will be powerful enough. Tongue

The saved money might be better invested into periphery, like a 4k monitor.

Cheers,
Petra
(11-09-2020, 03:48 AM)Petra-Kathi Wrote: [ -> ]Before giving any suggestions, better say what you will use the notebook for, or what "absolute nono's" you have.

As a 99% Linux user I am very content with a Lenovo T470 that I bought as 2nd hand machine, with 16 GB RAM, 1 TB SSD and two docks, for less than 400 EUR. In general: If you don't have a very special application case that requires top-of-the row power in any aspect, better buy a used machine for one of the many nerds who think only the newest machines will be powerful enough. Tongue

The saved money might be better invested into periphery, like a 4k monitor.

Cheers,
Petra

It will mainly be used for the basic things  - email, social media, forums, writing the odd document.  In addition, I will be doing some light audio and video editing.

I looked at some of the Lenovo machines, but the T470 is only a 14" screen and I would want something a little larger.  My current machine is dual boot Windows/Linux, but I rarely use the Linux side and wouldn't bother doing that again. 

I'm replacing an old machine (6 years or more) and as it will probably be the last one I buy before I die, I'm trying to cover all the angles.

Regards
Graeme
Hello Graeme,

(11-09-2020, 09:18 PM)GraemeJ Wrote: [ -> ]I looked at some of the Lenovo machines, but the T470 is only a 14" screen and I would want something a little larger.

Of course! Therefore my suggestion to spend the money on sensible periphery, like a 4k monitor, instead of investing into (mostly) superfluous calculational power. The Lenovo was just an example that I know by own usage. Any other with similar processing power may do as well.

Quote:I'm replacing an old machine (6 years or more) and as it will probably be the last one I buy before I die, I'm trying to cover all the angles.

To cover all angles:
  • Acquire reasonable periphery
  • Take care of good interconnectivity: USB-C, USB-3.x, different monitor options, existence of a dock, ...
  • Exchangeability of batteries, possibility to upgrade "internals" (RAM, SSD, ...)

At least this is what I consider as relevant for an all-purpose notebook. The newest notebook comps are frequently not so persuasive in these aspects ...   Wink

Cheers,
Petra
Petra

I have no need for peripherals of any sort.  There are three powerful desktops here, originally used for my audio restoration business, should I need that level of computing power.  We also have two laptops (one of which is the one I'm replacing) and at least seven tablets - there's no lack of computing power here Wink .

I'm only looking for a half decent laptop that I can use in my living room.

Graeme