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Set and store indiviual volume level to each audio file
#1
Music 
There are several possibilities to manage the common volume for all audio files (volume control in mobilsheets, tablet,...), but there is no possibility to set and store the volume for one single audio file.
I often use mobilesheets with mp3-audio-files as play-along training.
Wherever the adio files are from, they have different basic volume level. I would like to fix the audio levels of all audio files to a similar level.
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#2
I always run my mp3 files through mp3gain, so they are normalized to the same level of loudness. Would that be feasible for you?
Johan
www.johanvromans.nlwww.hetgeluidvanseptember.nlwww.howsagoin.nl
Samsung Galaxy Note S7FE (T733) 12.4", Android 11.0, AirTurn Duo & Digit.
Samsung Galaxy Note S4 (T830) 10.5", Android 10.0 (non-MSPRo, backup).
Samsung A3 (A320FL), Android 8.0.0 (emergency).
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#3
And if normalize does not work, use audio software with a limiter (or perhaps compressor) which will even out (lower) the peaks then raise the overall volume.
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#4
Just as a technical point, normalising individual tracks does not necessarily mean they will all play back at the same perceived volume level.
Graeme

1: Samsung 12.2" SM-P900: Android 5.0.2 
2: eSTAR GRAND HD Quad-Core 4G 10.2": Android 5.1 
3: Home-built BT pedal

Some of my music here
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#5
Can you elaborate?
Johan
www.johanvromans.nlwww.hetgeluidvanseptember.nlwww.howsagoin.nl
Samsung Galaxy Note S7FE (T733) 12.4", Android 11.0, AirTurn Duo & Digit.
Samsung Galaxy Note S4 (T830) 10.5", Android 10.0 (non-MSPRo, backup).
Samsung A3 (A320FL), Android 8.0.0 (emergency).
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#6
I will try mp3gain, but I think it would be more comfortable to set and save audio level individually.
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#7
I am adding the ability to specify the volume per audio file in the next update (v1.0.7). I'm doing everything in my power to get that update finished today as I'll be out of town this whole week.
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#8
(05-10-2015, 10:21 PM)sciurius Wrote: Can you elaborate?

Normalising is a simple mathematical process that increases the overall level, such that the peak level is at whatever you have set it at (usually 0dB, or marginally less). If the original peak level was lower that this, then the track will, indeed, sound louder.

However, due to the way our ears work, the perceived volume of a track is actually related to the RMS average of the whole track and normalising does not change that average - it remains the same.

To take a practical example, a track with a wide dynamic range (say an orchestral piece with a solo instrument) with its peak level set to maximum will still sound quieter than a (say) heavy metal track, where it is almost brick-walled in terms of level and therefore has a much higher average level.

If you really want to make all your tracks have the same perceived volume, then it is necessary to compare all of them with each other and adjust the average level to the be the same for each one.
Graeme

1: Samsung 12.2" SM-P900: Android 5.0.2 
2: eSTAR GRAND HD Quad-Core 4G 10.2": Android 5.1 
3: Home-built BT pedal

Some of my music here
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#9
(05-11-2015, 06:24 AM)GraemeJ Wrote: Normalising is a simple mathematical process that increases the overall level, such that the peak level is at whatever you have set it at (usually 0dB, or marginally less). If the original peak level was lower that this, then the track will, indeed, sound louder.

However, due to the way our ears work, the perceived volume of a track is actually related to the RMS average of the whole track and normalising does not change that average - it remains the same.

Quoting from the mp3gain documentation:

Quote:mp3gain does not just do peak normalization, as many normalizers do. Instead, it does some statistical analysis to determine how loud the file actually sounds to the human ear.

This seems to me exactly what is desired.
Johan
www.johanvromans.nlwww.hetgeluidvanseptember.nlwww.howsagoin.nl
Samsung Galaxy Note S7FE (T733) 12.4", Android 11.0, AirTurn Duo & Digit.
Samsung Galaxy Note S4 (T830) 10.5", Android 10.0 (non-MSPRo, backup).
Samsung A3 (A320FL), Android 8.0.0 (emergency).
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#10
MP3gain makes a fair stab at it, as does Volume Balancer (for .wav files). Audition has some neat algorithms for doing the work. That said, most engineers would agree the best way to do the job is by ear.
Graeme

1: Samsung 12.2" SM-P900: Android 5.0.2 
2: eSTAR GRAND HD Quad-Core 4G 10.2": Android 5.1 
3: Home-built BT pedal

Some of my music here
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#11
I would use one song's audio file as your reference and compare how loud it sounds with all the other audio files you have as you process them to add to MS. The newly added song volume setting Mike has added could be set to less than maximum so if you still need a little more volume on specific songs after processing or new ones you do not have time to process yet, you can boost its level towards the existing ones.
As you have found, different songs have different 'volumes' even though they are professionally produced. The amount of limiting (etc.) they have chosen is for particular reasons, so the amount of limiting or audio processing needs to be assessed for each song.
Different software will call this kind of processing by different names.
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