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Display setlist title
#1
Currently if you go Settings ->Display Settings and check "Always Show the Title Bar" this will show the bar at the top with the name of the current song. This is not a useful feature for me.  What would be useful is to show the name of the setlist.  Would anybody else like to see this feature added?

I'm curious as to why anyone would want to see the current song.  (I don't mean this in a snarky way - I really am curious.) From my way of looking at it, I already know the current song: it's the one I'm playing.  However I might not remember the set number.  If a band member asks me "What set are we on?" I'd like to be able to tell them.

Thanks for any feedback.
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#2
For me, the question "what set are we on" seems even more weird. When I have a gig, I make one (or more, usually 2 or 3) setlists for this gig and play them sequentially.
I must add my songs are mostly ChordPro songs that have the title on top anyway.
Johan
www.johanvromans.nlwww.hetgeluidvanseptember.nlwww.howsagoin.nl
Samsung Galaxy Note S4 (T830) 10.5", Android 9.0, AirTurn Duo & Digit.
Samsung Galaxy Note 2 (N8010) 10.1", Android 7.1.2 (LineageOS) (backup).
Samsung A3 (A320FL), Android 8.0 (emergency).
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#3
I'm not going to comment on what's the weirdest thing to (not) remember  Big Grin

I always have "Show Title" on, because I can start annotating with a single tap
(the pencil), instead of first tapping for the overlay and then another tap to
annotate.

Ketil
Using Samsung Note Pro (SM-P900) with Android 5.0.2
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#4
Ketil,

Don't forget you can also use a two or three finger tap (depending upon how you want to configure it) to bring up the annotations editor. The default is three finger tap, so I use that as it's faster than going through the overlay.

Mike
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#5
Ketil:  If I understand you correctly, seeing the current song allows you to pencil in annotations. Thanks for the explanation.

Scirius: I guess not knowing the setlist would sound weird to most musicians.  Writing down a setlist to refer to during a gig must work for most musicians but my situation is different.

I play in a large community contra-dance band.   It's rare for musicians to know what they are going to play beforehand.  

This is what an evening of contra dancing looks like.  A "caller" announces what the next dance will be and spends a few minutes teaching it to the dancers. She also tells the band what kind of music she wants for next dance. Like she might say, "I need some bouncy jigs", or "I want something smooth and flowing."  The musicians then put together 3 or 4 tunes, known as a "set" that will fit the callers requirement on the spur of the moment.  

In small bands the musicians will confer among themselves to choose the tunes for the upcoming set.  In a large band like ours, that would be too unwieldy. Instead, we have a band leader who talks it over with the caller and then tells the rest of us what we're going to play.  But she doesn't name the tunes for us.  She tells us what number set to refer to in our band's book of sheet music.

In other words, we have pre-arranged printed sets, each of which is assigned a number and arranged numerically.  So when the band leader calls out the number of the next set, we thumb through our books to find the sheet music for the tunes we will be playing.  But with all the noise in the hall not all of us hear her, and more often then not, several people will turn to their neighbors and ask, "What set are we playing?" or even "Do we have a set number yet.?"

To summarize, a set is the 3 or 4 tunes chosen on the spur of the moment for the next tune.  A set list, if we had one, would look like
"100, 96, 117, 84..." and so on.  Actually, there is a set list but it doesn't exist until the dance is over.  Our secretary sends around the set lists for every rehearsal and dance we played twice a month.
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#6
In small bands the musicians will confer among themselves to choose the tunes for the upcoming set. In a large band like ours, that would be too unwieldy. Instead, we have a band leader who talks it over with the caller and then tells the rest of us what we're going to play. But she doesn't name the tunes for us. She tells us what number set to refer to in our band's book of sheet music.

In other words, we have pre-arranged printed sets, each of which is assigned a number and arranged numerically. So when the band leader calls out the number of the next set, we thumb through our books to find the sheet music for the tunes we will be playing. But with all the noise in the hall not all of us hear her, and more often then not, several people will turn to their neighbors and ask, "What set are we playing?" or even "Do we have a set number yet.?"

To summarize, a set is the 3 or 4 tunes chosen on the spur of the moment for the next tune. A set list, if we had one, would look like "100, 96, 117, 84..." and so on. Actually, there is a set list but it doesn't exist until after the dance is over. Our secretary sends around the set lists for every rehearsal and dance we played twice a month.
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#7
I now understand the specific situation you're in.. It is, indeed, quite different from what I'm used to.
Johan
www.johanvromans.nlwww.hetgeluidvanseptember.nlwww.howsagoin.nl
Samsung Galaxy Note S4 (T830) 10.5", Android 9.0, AirTurn Duo & Digit.
Samsung Galaxy Note 2 (N8010) 10.1", Android 7.1.2 (LineageOS) (backup).
Samsung A3 (A320FL), Android 8.0 (emergency).
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